Wednesday 25 April 2018

The intangible nature of Ireland's new, new economy

We must prepare to make the most of the potential in our changing economy, writes Minister for Finance Paschal Donohoe

The Ireland of 2018 is in many ways unrecognisable from the country it was only 20 years ago. Stock Image
The Ireland of 2018 is in many ways unrecognisable from the country it was only 20 years ago. Stock Image

Paschal Donohoe

The bicentennial of the birth of Karl Marx takes place in May. When considering the changes in the Irish economy over the years, I am struck by his oft-cited passage in The Communist Manifesto that "all that is not solid melts into air".

As I remarked in a speech to Ibec last week, we in Ireland are not experiencing the melting of investment and trade, but we are seeing a change, even if that change is to less solid, but no less real, investments.

The Ireland of 2018 is in many ways unrecognisable from the country it was only 20 years ago. As well as benefiting from the many new citizens and communities that have chosen Ireland as their home, we have seen huge growth in the development of new companies.

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