Wednesday 22 November 2017

The Euro Project is stalled after the 'two Englands' split up

Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning. Photo: Getty
Supporters of the 'Stronger In' Campaign react as results of the EU referendum are announced at a results party at the Royal Festival Hall in London early in the morning. Photo: Getty

The great industrial cities in the midlands and the north of England have collectively let out a resounding roar. Newcastle, Liverpool, Manchester, Leeds, Birmingham, Sunderland and a host of others are names that resonate in this country, mostly because of their football league clubs.

But over the past 24 hours what has been a seething rage and anger - among white, working-class voters - has erupted with unprecedented consequences. There were two clear-cut reasons why this section of the population said an overwhelming 'no' to the EU and all those who support it as an institution.

The first is many of them live in areas where unemployment, under-employment and a surfeit of low-paid, insecure work has become the norm. The other factor is that hundreds of thousands of these citizens feel their situation has been made worse by what they perceive as too many immigrants living in their communities.

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