| 13.4°C Dublin

Close

Premium


The Amber Heard hate campaign is being called the end of #MeToo, but Irish defamation law means the movement never even got started here

Ellen Coyne


Close

Amber Heard attends Johnny Depp's defamation case against her, at the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse, Virginia. Picture: Jim Watson/Reuters

Amber Heard attends Johnny Depp's defamation case against her, at the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse, Virginia. Picture: Jim Watson/Reuters

Amber Heard attends Johnny Depp's defamation case against her, at the Fairfax County Circuit Courthouse, Virginia. Picture: Jim Watson/Reuters

The trial between Amber Heard and Johnny Depp is like a poisonous gas, seeping into all of our lives. I set futile barriers, unfollowing all the gossip Instagram accounts that had soured with their gleeful spectatorship of the gruelling trial. I didn’t seek out the websites for whom this miserable saga has proved so lucrative.

But broadsheet newspapers still pushed it to me, and the faces of the plaintiff and defendant have become ubiquitous on my timeline. It feels like Depp and Heard are oddities in a menagerie, and all of our noses are being pressed against the glass.


Most Watched





Privacy