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Society tells women to stay safe yet ignores the real problem – toxic male behaviour

Martina Devlin


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Flowers are left at the sealed-off area where teacher Ashling Murphy was killed by a stranger while jogging along a canal bank in Tullamore, Co Offaly. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Flowers are left at the sealed-off area where teacher Ashling Murphy was killed by a stranger while jogging along a canal bank in Tullamore, Co Offaly. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Flowers are left at the sealed-off area where teacher Ashling Murphy was killed by a stranger while jogging along a canal bank in Tullamore, Co Offaly. Photo: Steve Humphreys

Rule number one for women on how to avoid being attacked, raped or murdered: never leave home. Not to work, not to exercise, not to shop and definitely not to socialise. Unfortunately, domestic violence means staying indoors won’t guarantee absolute safety, but it does offer a certain level of protection.

A radical solution to gender-based violence, you might think, and you’d be right. This is hardly a desirable state of affairs – a society in which women lock themselves away, fearful of doing something as healthy as going for a daytime run.


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