| 13.2°C Dublin

Close

Premium


Secular society, Brexit and looser ties of identity point only one way for Northern Ireland

Martina Devlin


Close

Most in Stormont want the protocol to have time and space to work; but a minority have been allowed to interfere with democracy. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA

Most in Stormont want the protocol to have time and space to work; but a minority have been allowed to interfere with democracy. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA

Most in Stormont want the protocol to have time and space to work; but a minority have been allowed to interfere with democracy. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA

“Lord, we know what we are, but know not what we may be,” Ophelia says in Hamlet. Change is hard-wired into the human condition and is often invisible to the naked eye, but – unusually – the Northern Ireland census returns show it happening right before our gaze.

A mirror is being held up to the Northern Irish state, and there is cause for hope in its findings. Not because one majority has been eroded by another, but because of the secular and middle ground’s rise and the appetite – apparent from passport figures – for EU membership.


Most Watched





Privacy