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Political institutions face the ultimate test

Dan O'Brien


Our national and European systems of government must step up to the plate in fighting the coronavirus

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'All focus must be on handling the health crisis and allocating the vast resources of the State in the most efficient way possible to save lives and limit the collateral damage of the virus.' Stock image

'All focus must be on handling the health crisis and allocating the vast resources of the State in the most efficient way possible to save lives and limit the collateral damage of the virus.' Stock image

'All focus must be on handling the health crisis and allocating the vast resources of the State in the most efficient way possible to save lives and limit the collateral damage of the virus.' Stock image

These are the last days of anything resembling normality - for the next few months at least. There is every reason to believe that one of the biggest changes in our lifetime is upon us. There is little reason to believe that the coronavirus will burn itself out quickly.

We can only hope that a vaccine can be found and trialled at an accelerated rate to protect us all, and in particular the proportion of population that is really vulnerable.

How will society respond to life being disrupted as significantly as it is about to be? Will the inchoate anger that has infected politics across the western world in recent years be amplified as the virus takes its toll or will the mood change entirely? Could people suddenly become nostalgic for the recent past that some were desperate to change, coming to believe that things weren't so bad after all?