Saturday 22 September 2018

Playing blame game sets us up for failure

Because of the public's desire for blame, it affects the way politicians behave

'The Government's scoping inquiry, headed by Dr Gabriel Scally, is tasked with finding out some of the basic facts.' Photo: Mark Condren
'The Government's scoping inquiry, headed by Dr Gabriel Scally, is tasked with finding out some of the basic facts.' Photo: Mark Condren

Eoin O'Malley

The State giveth, the State taketh away. If it's taking away a square metre of your front garden this could net you €25,000. Those less lucky, whose cancers were not detected in a screening programme, and who were then not informed when it was discovered that their screens were misread, will receive ex-gratia payments of €2,000.

This isn't the value the State is putting on the pain caused to the women and their families, the offer seems just an unfortunate example of the State dealing with the cancer screening issue badly.

Well that's what we think. But the most notable aspect of the scandal is how little we know. We're still not certain of basic facts - such as whether the US laboratory contracted to read the slides from the smear tests were worse than labs in Ireland doing the readings.

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