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Patricia Casey: 'It's embarrassing to watch us stereotype Brexiteers'

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Jacob Rees-Mogg walks past an anti-Brexit proteste. Photo: Reuters

Jacob Rees-Mogg walks past an anti-Brexit proteste. Photo: Reuters

Jacob Rees-Mogg walks past an anti-Brexit proteste. Photo: Reuters

Since I was four years old I have been having a love affair with London. My mother's descriptions of St Martin-in-the Fields, of Hyde Park Corner, of the pit in the Royal Albert Hall during the Proms, stimulated my imagination beyond description. The imagery of London has extended to the rest of Britain and ultimately become reality for me. I was privileged to be able to afford a small flat in London 10 years ago. Because of my strong bond to London and to Britain itself, I am horrified at the stereotyping of the British people that Brexit has stimulated in the coverage of it in Ireland.

Mostly the view here is that Brexiteers are either rich dim-wits or uneducated racists. Progressives they are not, according to the spokespeople in the media. The stereotypical well-heeled, posh toffs such as Boris Johnson and Jacob Rees-Mogg wanting Old England to rule the waves are juxtapositioned alongside the working classes of Humberside wishing to quell immigration lest they lose jobs to foreigners.


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