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Our goal should be a world with fewer abortions

Wendy Grace


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Anti-abortion activists celebrate on June 24 after the US Supreme Court overturned the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case. Picture by Brandon Bell

Anti-abortion activists celebrate on June 24 after the US Supreme Court overturned the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case. Picture by Brandon Bell

Anti-abortion activists celebrate on June 24 after the US Supreme Court overturned the landmark 50-year-old Roe v Wade case. Picture by Brandon Bell

Just over a week ago the Supreme Court of the US overturned Roe v Wade, its 1973 court ruling that legalised abortion up to birth across the US. Continually pilloried by large sections of the media, pro-lifers in the US worked tirelessly and painstakingly for many years for a day most people thought would never arrive.

Let’s be clear: the US Supreme Court did not ban abortion. It simply declared there was no constitutional right to abortion and has left it up to the individual states of the US to set their own laws on the issue. Up until the court made its decision, the US was part of a small club of nations such as China and North Korea that allowed abortion on demand past the 20-week point. Now that Roe is overturned, the practice of late-term abortions can be outlawed and legal protection for unborn babies can be introduced at state level. That’s a huge step forward, not backwards, for human rights.


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