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Our coalitions are held together with Sellotape and Blu-Tack - but they're democratic and fair

Jason O'Mahony


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Proportional Representation: ‘Our system is not to directly elect a government. But if voters want to actually vote on who is going to be in government, that’s a whole different ballgame.’ Photo: REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

Proportional Representation: ‘Our system is not to directly elect a government. But if voters want to actually vote on who is going to be in government, that’s a whole different ballgame.’ Photo: REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

Proportional Representation: ‘Our system is not to directly elect a government. But if voters want to actually vote on who is going to be in government, that’s a whole different ballgame.’ Photo: REUTERS/Henry Nicholls

If you were a Trumpian climate change denier who didn't really want Ireland to actually do anything about it you could do an awful lot worse than back the fundamentalist wing of the Green Party.

It sounds counter-intuitive, but if the Fianna Fáil/Fine Gael/Green programme for government is adopted there will be significant climate change policies implemented, including carbon taxation. It may not be the total of what the Green Party is looking for but it is certainly a movement in the right direction, half a loaf as opposed to no loaf. Even the fundamentalists (Deep Greens?) would surely admit that if the party does not get into government, less green-friendly policies will be implemented, especially on the issue of road building. If Deep Greens decide to become Alphabet Left-style armchair purists and sideline hand-wringers, the better it is for the extreme anti-climate change action, right.

It's a choice between putting one's hand to the wheel or engaging in self-indulgent political self-pleasuring.