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On the precipice of a new world, men too can be saved from trauma of the patriarchy

Melanie Lynch


To celebrate Father's Day, Herstory honours the dads who have empowered their daughters throughout the centuries and Herstory's godfathers who have played a pivotal role in co-creating the Irish Herstory movement

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Hero: Feminist movement Herstory has told the history of many forgotten women, including pioneering aviator Lady Mary Heath, hailed here in an image projected here onto Collins Barracks. Photo: Arthur Carron

Hero: Feminist movement Herstory has told the history of many forgotten women, including pioneering aviator Lady Mary Heath, hailed here in an image projected here onto Collins Barracks. Photo: Arthur Carron

Hero: Feminist movement Herstory has told the history of many forgotten women, including pioneering aviator Lady Mary Heath, hailed here in an image projected here onto Collins Barracks. Photo: Arthur Carron

Long before a man walked on the moon, a lunar crater was named in honour of Cork woman and 19th-century pioneering astronomer Agnes Mary Clerke. It was her father who nurtured her childhood curiosity in the stars, teaching her the basics of astronomy and lending his telescope to explore the night's sky.

In the same era, aspiring young naturalist Mary Ward collected insects and studied them under her father's magnifying glass, recording the specimens in intricate drawings.

When she was a teenager, her father gifted her one of the finest microscopes in Ireland at the time, leading to a life-long passion and esteemed scientific career.