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O'Malley report is a reset for handling of sex crimes, with fairness at its heart

Larissa Nolan


Recommendations to protect the accused won't please the #MeToo pitchfork mob, but dignity and respect should be afforded to all involved, writes Larissa Nolan

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'In a way, there is a mutualism between the accused and the accuser. How one is treated affects the other, and vice versa, with knock-on effects. So the system must afford protections to both' (stock photo)

'In a way, there is a mutualism between the accused and the accuser. How one is treated affects the other, and vice versa, with knock-on effects. So the system must afford protections to both' (stock photo)

'In a way, there is a mutualism between the accused and the accuser. How one is treated affects the other, and vice versa, with knock-on effects. So the system must afford protections to both' (stock photo)

I had to sit across from my rapist in a police station in France. That was the procedure there, a little over a decade ago. The idea of being in the same room as the man who had committed an unspeakable violation against me less than 24 hours earlier was nightmarish.

But it wasn't the worst part. Answering police questions, I unthinkingly touched the detective's forearm while trying to articulate myself. He recoiled from me as though I was radioactive. I was not to be trusted. I burned with shame.


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