Sunday 13 October 2019

Notebook: Inevitability of our death doesn't mean you can ignore clubcard deal

Irish Independent columnist Bill Linnane
Irish Independent columnist Bill Linnane
Bill Linnane

Bill Linnane

When the science fiction writer Philip K Dick died in 1982, his ashes were buried under a headstone that had carried his name for 52 years. When his twin sister passed away five decades earlier, both their names were inscribed on the stone at the same time, presumably by family members who were more worried about cost-effective measures than their son's mental state.

Dick lived his life in constant paranoia, hardly surprising for a man who had a grave awaiting with his name on it. It sounds like a plot point from one of his brilliant, paradoxical works, which posed big questions about reality; questions like, if you knew when you were going to die, would you live differently? It's a question that we may need to start asking ourselves, as researchers have created an program that can estimate our life expectancy. The team of researchers - from the third-level thunderdome that is the University of Adelaide - simply feed scans of your organs into the application and it comes back with a 69pc accuracy of when you are going to expire.

The crushing inevitability of our own demise is something we tend not to think about a whole lot, but probably should. Hopefully this technology will trickle down to the point where you will be able to scan yourself at the supermarket self-service checkout and get your own expiration date. Perhaps then we might think less about collecting clubcard points and more about buying time on earth through positive choices. Unless it's double points on family packs of crisps, that just makes financial sense.

Mother's ruin gets a facelift

Speaking of endless waits for ascension into the heavens - Dublin Airport. The Loop, the airport's duty free, was the scene last week for the launch of a new gin, which in itself is not remarkable, given a new gin seems to land on our shelves with the frequency of Ryanair arrivals. This gin, however, is different.

While most gins promise 'locally sourced botanicals' such as magpie's nest or eye of newt, creators Camilla Brown and Liz Beswick have infused their new product from that least appealing yet most local of botanicals - us. Or rather, powdered synthetic collagen, the main structural protein found in skin and other connective tissues. It is most associated with cosmetic surgery or anti-ageing therapies, the most tragic skirmishes in our battle with mortality, and this new product - CollAGin - is a nifty rebrand from the drink formerly known as mother's ruin to an elixir of youth. That or a sort of Soylent Green for jetlagged housewives.

Welcome to the sunny side of youth

Our skin deep obsession with beauty was thrown into sharp relief as recent statistics showed a rise in the use of sunbeds by Irish teenagers.

Speaking as someone who used them in his early 20s, I look back now and wonder what I was thinking, as they turned me a shade of orange best described as a Full Scale Dale Winton, but which a friend helpfully called a 'third wipe' shade of brown.

To this day I still have blotches of pigmentation that show up when the sun is out, like a mid-transition Michael Jackson or a slowly combusting vampire.

Sunbeds are awful. Apart from the cancer risks, they make you look like an Hermes ostrich-skin Birkin that's been through the washing machine.

And now that another recent survey showed that young Irish people are drinking less too, our poor beige-tinted young folk can't even claw back their youth by quaffing collagen-infused gin, proving that George Bernard Shaw was right when he wrote that youth is a wonderful thing, but what a crime it is to waste it on children.

Mortality and skin were the topics in the journal 'BMJ Case Reports', which detailed the death of a man who got a skin infection while swimming in the Gulf of Mexico.

Suffering from chronic liver disease, he had recently got an inspirational tattoo, which allowed the infection into his skin, and ultimately killed him two months later.

Although the ironic elements of his death will bring little comfort to his family, perhaps his journey to heaven will be accelerated by the subject of the tattoo that led to his death: A crucifix with praying hands and the inscription 'Jesus is my life'.

Irish Independent

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