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Nailing your colours to the mast of conspiracy could prove fatal

Sarah Carey


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Past example: Dr Andrew Wakefield’s (centre) paper on a link between autism in children and the MMR jab was discredited but the damage was done. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

Past example: Dr Andrew Wakefield’s (centre) paper on a link between autism in children and the MMR jab was discredited but the damage was done. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

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Past example: Dr Andrew Wakefield’s (centre) paper on a link between autism in children and the MMR jab was discredited but the damage was done. Photo: Peter Macdiarmid/Getty

I got a bit nostalgic reading about people burning mobile phone masts in Donegal. It took me back to my youthful twenties when I encountered mast protesters all the time. I was a "site-finder" for Esat Digifone, the mobile phone company.

I remember once, when construction workers were using chainsaws to cut a tree that had been deliberately felled at the entrance to a site, and a man flung his small daughter in front of them. Since he was worried about health effects from mobile phone antennas but was willing to throw his child in the path of a chainsaw, it was a revealing moment in how people assess risk.

Despite the objectors, I never lost a site and I give "my" masts a little wave when passing them today.