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Kelly didn’t help himself, but Labour’s extinction rebellion sealed his fate

Shane Ross


Labour’s palace coup leaves the possibility of a left-leaning opposition coalescing to counter Mary Lou’s bombast with the finesse of sweet reason

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Former Labour Party leader Alan Kelly faces the press from the plinth outside Leinster House, Dublin, on Wednesday. Picture by Neil Carson

Former Labour Party leader Alan Kelly faces the press from the plinth outside Leinster House, Dublin, on Wednesday. Picture by Neil Carson

Former Labour Party leader Alan Kelly faces the press from the plinth outside Leinster House, Dublin, on Wednesday. Picture by Neil Carson

Alan Kelly has a people problem. He made an awful lot of enemies on his way up the greasy political pole. Last week, he could have done with a few friends. They were thin on the ground.

For a Labour leader who has been a senator, a deputy, an MEP and a minister, he might have expected to pick up a few close comrades on his political journey. On Wednesday, as he made his resignation speech on the Leinster House plinth, he was surrounded by the entire Labour parliamentary party. And he was all alone.


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