| 12°C Dublin

Close

Premium


Johnson's risky approach to virus raises new questions about Irish unity

John Downing


 

Close

Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster (left) and Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster (left) and Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

Northern Ireland First Minister Arlene Foster (left) and Deputy First Minister Michelle O’Neill. Photo: Liam McBurney/PA Wire

You have to go back seven and a half centuries - to some years before 1283 - to find Welsh patrols on their borders ready to stop English "intruders".

But now police in north Wales have said they will "advise and explain" to English holidaymakers, heading for the delights of Snowdonia or the Welsh coast, that they are breaching the "essential journeys only" rule. Fines will ensue if those English visitors do not take the Welsh constabulary's advice.

This is surely the most standout development in a parting of the ways between London and its home rule governments in Cardiff, Edinburgh and Belfast, in the fight against coronavirus. The devolved administrations have all found Prime Minister Boris Johnson's key-note messages on phasing out of the lockdown too confusing, too vague, and too risky.


Most Watched





Privacy