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It's good to talk: how phone calls comfort us in times of crisis

Kathy Donaghy


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'While the phone is providing a portal into the lives of our loved ones at a time when we can’t see them, it’s a lifeline for many others who are weighed down by the loneliness and stress of this time.' (stock photo)

'While the phone is providing a portal into the lives of our loved ones at a time when we can’t see them, it’s a lifeline for many others who are weighed down by the loneliness and stress of this time.' (stock photo)

'While the phone is providing a portal into the lives of our loved ones at a time when we can’t see them, it’s a lifeline for many others who are weighed down by the loneliness and stress of this time.' (stock photo)

'Hello, how are you?" says the voice at the other end of the line. At a time when we can't see one another, a phone call, that friendly voice in your ear saying your name, has come to mean so much.

Yes, we have Zoom and WhatsApp video calls and Skype, but it's hard to beat the humble phone call - that familiar voice asking how you're keeping and what you're up to.

A call to your mum who's cocooning, your sister who's homeschooling the kids and glad to take a break, your old school friend who you've been meaning to call for ages - these plain old voice calls, a medium that's been going out of fashion for years, are everyday threads that connect us with our lives pre-Covid-19.