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It seems a little extraordinary that we are still talking about what women can and can’t wear in 2021

Stefanie Preissner


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Hannah Looney of Cork gets away from Katie Nolan and Katie Power, right, of Kilkenny during the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Semi-Final match between Cork and Kilkenny at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Hannah Looney of Cork gets away from Katie Nolan and Katie Power, right, of Kilkenny during the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Semi-Final match between Cork and Kilkenny at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Hannah Looney of Cork gets away from Katie Nolan and Katie Power, right, of Kilkenny during the All-Ireland Senior Camogie Championship Semi-Final match between Cork and Kilkenny at Croke Park in Dublin. Photo: Piaras Ó Mídheach/Sportsfile

Since women first stepped into a sporting arena, there have been Herculean efforts to police what they wear. The rules range from forcing women to hide their bodies (presumably to reinforce a broken idea of refined feminine grace) to the other extreme of exposing the female form (possibly to entice men to engage with the sport and maybe sell tickets).

There are battles on every side playing out across the world. Recently we’ve seen global outrage focused on a fine levied against a Norwegian women’s beach handball team. The team chose to compete in shorts rather than bikini bottoms. It took months of accusations of sexism for the International Handball Federation to update its rules on the prescribed uniform.


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