| 7.4°C Dublin

Close

Premium


Ireland has become an attractive safe haven island for affluent climate change migrants looking for somewhere to hide

John Daly


Close

Just as Dinny Byrne stuck feathers on eggs in Glenroe, there will be similar agricultural entrepreneurs keen to serve climate change immigrants

Just as Dinny Byrne stuck feathers on eggs in Glenroe, there will be similar agricultural entrepreneurs keen to serve climate change immigrants

Just as Dinny Byrne stuck feathers on eggs in Glenroe, there will be similar agricultural entrepreneurs keen to serve climate change immigrants

Not everyone hates Putin these days – and that goes especially for the auctioneering profession located in some of Ireland’s most remote regions. The whole thing has gone bonkers, one realtor explained, five years ago you couldn’t get anyone to look at a rural cottage – and now the whole world wants a half acre of bogland in the middle of nowhere. If the pandemic legacy of working from home started the foreplay in this rustic romance, Putin’s invasion of Ukraine has pushed the passion for a pastoral idyll to a resounding climax.

Rocks and rushes – the bane of any farmer’s life – have suddenly transformed abysmal agricultural acres into six-figure goldmines in the most isolated corners. Bad land perched on poorly drained hillsides or plots oozing damp on forlorn valley floors are the prize many a billionaire from Silicon Valley to Shanghai is chasing In a line from Baltimore to Buncrana, helicopter viewings have become a growth industry six months.


Most Watched





Privacy