Tuesday 21 November 2017

Imams split over fears Irish Muslims are being radicalised in mosques

Irish Muslim leaders were united in condemning the Paris atrocities - but deep divisions lie beneath, writes Maeve Sheehan

Flowers on the beach at the scene of the massacre in Sousse, Tunisia
Flowers on the beach at the scene of the massacre in Sousse, Tunisia
Maeve Sheehan

Maeve Sheehan

After the massacre of holidaymakers, including three Irish citizens, on a Tunisian beach last June, the Dublin Imam, Shaykh Dr Umar al-Qadri, invited Muslims to march against the "so-called Islamic State of Iraq and Levant (Isil)".

Dr al-Qadri, who is Imam at the al-Mustafa Islamic Centre in Blanchardstown and founder of the Muslim Peace and Integration Council, organised the march under the banner, 'Not in My Name' to show opposition to the "murderous campaign" carried out by the so-called Islamic State. "This is not our Islam," the poster declared.

The march took place on O'Connell Street in July 26. There are an estimated 50,000 Muslims living in Ireland, some say 75,000. According to newspaper reports at the time, only 50 showed up for the march.

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