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I’m a serial quitter who has walked away from two PhDs, two degrees and countless jobs and I don’t regret a thing

Tanya Sweeney


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'Wanting to feel valued in a workplace has got nothing to do with being unreliable or impulsive, and everything to do with knowing your own worth’

'Wanting to feel valued in a workplace has got nothing to do with being unreliable or impulsive, and everything to do with knowing your own worth’

'Wanting to feel valued in a workplace has got nothing to do with being unreliable or impulsive, and everything to do with knowing your own worth’

For years, we were inundated with hysterical headlines about how entitled, delicate and narcissistic millennials were. And now, it’s Gen Z’s turn to get raked over the coals . ‘Work-shy’ seems to come up time and time again as an accusation. This week, it was revealed via a Deloitte survey that half of Irish Gen-Z workers were planning to leave their current job within two years. And it’s not just in Ireland . In the US, 4.4 million people, most of them under 26, quit their jobs in April alone. Experts are calling it ‘the great resignation’, as youngsters leave jobs to seek out better work-life balance and more favourable conditions.

The idea of quitting as a negative thing is a hangover from the ‘job for life’ era. Quitting — work, college, relationships — is seen as something that’s problematic. It’s flaky. Selfish. Weak. It’s the polar opposite of all the things that are deemed ‘good’ qualities in people. Consistency. Dedication. Loyalty. Never giving in. Quitters never win and winners never quit.


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