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Ignoring Trump bid to rig an election wasn't a serious option

Max Boot


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That’s torn it: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rips up her copy of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address. Photo: Reuters

That’s torn it: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rips up her copy of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address. Photo: Reuters

REUTERS

That’s torn it: House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rips up her copy of President Donald Trump’s State of the Union address. Photo: Reuters

After 134 tumultuous days, the impeachment of President Donald Trump ended in a predictable near-party-line acquittal this week by the Republican-controlled Senate. Out of 250 Republicans in Congress, only one - Senator Mitt Romney of Utah - had the courage of his conscience, voting to convict on first of the two articles. (Representative Justin Amash of Michigan, a former Republican, also supported impeachment.)

Was it worth it? As Zhou Enlai supposedly said of the French Revolution, it's too early to say. But so far, impeachment has not lived up to either the greatest hopes or the worst fears of its advocates. In the best-case scenario, the incontrovertible weight of evidence would have led more than one Republican to turn against the president.

US House Speaker Nancy Pelosi rips up her copy of President Donald Trump's State of the Union speech after he finishes speaking.

No one ever imagined that there would be 67 votes to remove him, but it was at least conceivable that advocates of impeachment could obtain a bare Senate majority and thus make it harder for Trump to claim that this was all a partisan plot.