| 8.7°C Dublin

Close

Premium


'I can't remember the last time I sat for two hours and cried at a film with my sister'

Gráinne Sexton


Close

'In a world which seems increasingly frenzied by the 24/7 nature of social media, I've also found comfort in the steadfastness and stability of television'

'In a world which seems increasingly frenzied by the 24/7 nature of social media, I've also found comfort in the steadfastness and stability of television'

'In a world which seems increasingly frenzied by the 24/7 nature of social media, I've also found comfort in the steadfastness and stability of television'

I read an article recently which detailed how traffic on the Birdwatch Ireland website has increased by 350pc in the six weeks since our national shutdown began.

A representative of Birdwatch Ireland was quoted as saying that many people felt the Covid-19 crisis had led to an increase in the number of birds, particularly because birdsong seems more prevalent at the moment. As I sat down to write this diary, I cracked my bedroom window open, hopeful that I might hear the chorus of chirping and twittering that has begun to form the soundtrack to life at home.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about the difficulty of measuring time during this global pandemic: the melting of one day into the next, the innocuous shift of March into April, the sudden manner in which the evenings have stretched. Coming from college life in Dublin, where I drew energy from a carousel of events - coffees with friends, interesting lectures, extracurricular commitments - I now feel stifled by the sameness of each day.