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How feminism and MeToo killed off the centrefold

Donal Lynch


The demise of the print edition of 'Playboy' marks a farewell to more innocent times, writes Donal Lynch

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Dolly Parton on the cover of Playboy in 1978

Dolly Parton on the cover of Playboy in 1978

Dolly Parton on the cover of Playboy in 1978

As elderly men around the world bunker down with only their wives for sexual company, you might have thought that the public was never more in need of Playboy. But, like Glenn Close in Fatal Attraction, coronavirus has done for the bunny.

"Throughout the past 66 years, one thing has remained constant: our commitment to free expression and breaking taboos, leaning into discomfort, helping audiences express and understand their sexuality, and advocating for the pursuit of pleasure for all," its CEO wrote, in an obituary of sorts.

Already facing significant financial troubles, it was a virus which sounded the death knell for the magazine's print edition, the company which publishes it said in a blog post last week. The 66-year-old Playboy magazine is dead.


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Darren wears: Suit, Canali; shirt, Kenzo; bracelet, Louis Vuitton, all Brown Thomas. Glasses, Darren Kennedy for Specsavers. Photo: Patrick McHugh Gallery