Tuesday 21 November 2017

How a corporation house saved me from life on wrong side of the tracks

'My life on the wrong side of the tracks was saved by government policy on social housing in the 1970s. It was also transformed by policies that supported people returning to education, and by the decriminalisation of homosexuality.' Stock Image
'My life on the wrong side of the tracks was saved by government policy on social housing in the 1970s. It was also transformed by policies that supported people returning to education, and by the decriminalisation of homosexuality.' Stock Image

Paul D'Alton

When I was five years old we were living on the 'wrong side of the tracks' in a rented house in Rialto, in Dublin 8. Late one afternoon, our home burnt down and we were homeless.

If that had happened today, we would be forced to live in a bed and breakfast - or even in a car - and our family might never have recovered.

But we were lucky. We were housed by Dublin Corporation because in the 1970s the State saw the provision of social housing as its job. It understood that without the fundamentals of housing and social supports, its citizens simply would not survive.

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