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Grassroots activism was key in keeping Bloody Sunday out of history’s waste bin

Martina Devlin


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Kate Nash, whose brother William was shot dead on Bloody Sunday on January 30, 1972. Photo: Lorcan Doherty

Kate Nash, whose brother William was shot dead on Bloody Sunday on January 30, 1972. Photo: Lorcan Doherty

Family member Julieann Camphill stands beside the Bloody Sunday mural depicting the body of her uncle, Jackie Duddy being carried away after his shooting in the Rossville Street area where soldiers opened fire on civil rights marchers, on March 13, 2019 in

Family member Julieann Camphill stands beside the Bloody Sunday mural depicting the body of her uncle, Jackie Duddy being carried away after his shooting in the Rossville Street area where soldiers opened fire on civil rights marchers, on March 13, 2019 in

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Kate Nash, whose brother William was shot dead on Bloody Sunday on January 30, 1972. Photo: Lorcan Doherty

The tragedy of Derry’s Bloody Sunday is not just because 14 innocent boys and men were slaughtered by uniformed agents of the British state. Not just because there was a cover-up, where the victims were demonised as bombers and gunmen. Not just because their families had to fight a lonely battle for almost 40 years to have their names cleared and the truth acknowledged.

All of the above is appalling, but the greatest calamity is that Bloody Sunday was instrumental in delivering 30 years of the Troubles.


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