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Good times Down Under prove there is life after Covid

Édaein O’Connell


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People congregate on a hillside as the sun sets at Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia this week. Photo: Reuters/Loren Elliott

People congregate on a hillside as the sun sets at Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia this week. Photo: Reuters/Loren Elliott

REUTERS

People congregate on a hillside as the sun sets at Bondi Beach in Sydney, Australia this week. Photo: Reuters/Loren Elliott

I may have to delete Instagram. I don’t know if I can take it anymore. Over the past few weekends, the stories function has been flooded with videos and pictures of friends and Irish people I don’t know enjoying themselves.

While I sat on my couch with a lukewarm can of gin and tonic, they were socialising in groups and having the craic. Now before you shout Level 5 restrictions, they aren’t in the country. They aren’t even in Europe. These people are in Australia and New Zealand. They are the Irish diaspora, and they are having more fun than us – and it’s hard to watch.

Last week, I planned a video call with a good friend from Cork, who now lives in Brisbane, Australia. On the agreed night, she ghosted me. A few days later, she messaged to say she had spontaneously decided to attend a comedy gig and woke up severely hungover on the morning of our catch-up. I told her I couldn’t remember what that felt like. She thought I was talking about the hangover, but what I meant was the spontaneity of her decision to go out. I can’t remember the last time any of us made plans with abandon.


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