Thursday 23 November 2017

Gardai face culture shock amid scrutiny from Policing Authority

A national security failure and a gangland war showing no signs of abating put severe pressure on O'Sullivan

Security lapse: A protester is tackled by the Canadian Ambassador to Ireland, Kevin Vickers, at the State event marking the deaths of British Soldiers in the Easter Rising at Grangegorman cemetery Photo: Tony Gavin
Security lapse: A protester is tackled by the Canadian Ambassador to Ireland, Kevin Vickers, at the State event marking the deaths of British Soldiers in the Easter Rising at Grangegorman cemetery Photo: Tony Gavin
Under pressure: Garda Commissioner Noirin O'Sullivan Photo: Mark Condren
Jim Cusack

Jim Cusack

With the succession of public gangland executions in Dublin's north inner city continuing unabated and criticisms of her stewardship swirling around her head, Garda Commissioner Noirin O'Sullivan had at least some reason to celebrate last week.

Her husband, Superintendent Jim Magowan, was promoted to chief superintendent, and with it a salary of €110,000, bringing the couple's combined public service income to over €300,000.

Last October the couple also had further reason to celebrate as their son became one of the top 100 of 24,000 applicants to join the Garda and was accepted into Templemore Garda College.

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