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Future looks bright as drug companies win virus-vaccine battle

Luke O'Neill


Given the current anxieties around Covid-19, both for our health and our economies, speed is now the key, writes Luke O'Neill

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'Vaccines are the biggest contribution to medicine, because they protect millions of people from getting nasty infectious diseases - diseases like measles, polio, diphtheria, cholera and typhoid, which terrified our ancestors'

'Vaccines are the biggest contribution to medicine, because they protect millions of people from getting nasty infectious diseases - diseases like measles, polio, diphtheria, cholera and typhoid, which terrified our ancestors'

'Vaccines are the biggest contribution to medicine, because they protect millions of people from getting nasty infectious diseases - diseases like measles, polio, diphtheria, cholera and typhoid, which terrified our ancestors'

When will there be a vaccine or a treatment for Covid-19?

Big question. As an immunologist I've seen nothing like it. There's a feeding frenzy to make a vaccine to protect us against SARS-CoV2 (the virus that causes the new lung disease called Covid-19). And there's an equally frenzied effort to make medicines that will protect you if you become infected.

This is good news. It means that ultimately Covid-19 will be beaten and we can all go back to normal. It's only a matter of when, and of course, the sooner the better.