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Forming a new government must come second to tackling virus and its effects

Dan O'Brien


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Patients infected by the COVID-19 coronavirus leave from Wuhan No.3 Hospital to Huoshenshan Hospital in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on March 4, 2020. - China on March 4 reported 38 more deaths from the new coronavirus but a fall in fresh cases for a third consecutive day. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

Patients infected by the COVID-19 coronavirus leave from Wuhan No.3 Hospital to Huoshenshan Hospital in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on March 4, 2020. - China on March 4 reported 38 more deaths from the new coronavirus but a fall in fresh cases for a third consecutive day. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

AFP via Getty Images

Patients infected by the COVID-19 coronavirus leave from Wuhan No.3 Hospital to Huoshenshan Hospital in Wuhan in China's central Hubei province on March 4, 2020. - China on March 4 reported 38 more deaths from the new coronavirus but a fall in fresh cases for a third consecutive day. (Photo by STR / AFP) / China OUT (Photo by STR/AFP via Getty Images)

It is now increasingly clear that the coronavirus will continue to spread. It is also clear it will have some negative consequences. Among the negative consequences is a likely slowdown in the domestic and global economies.

Before discussing that issue, consider the most important consequence of the outbreak - its impact on human health.

Although the virus has a low fatality rate, and that should fall further as the world learns by the day how to deal with it more effectively, it is around 20 times more deadly than the standard flu.