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For more women to succeed in politics, we must see ourselves as good enough to run

Catherine O'Mahony


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Change is possible: Four out of the Social Democrats’ six TDs in the new Dáil are women, from left, Jennifer Whitmore, Cian O’Callaghan, Catherine Murphy, Róisín Shortall, Gary Gannon, Holly Cairns. Photo: Collins

Change is possible: Four out of the Social Democrats’ six TDs in the new Dáil are women, from left, Jennifer Whitmore, Cian O’Callaghan, Catherine Murphy, Róisín Shortall, Gary Gannon, Holly Cairns. Photo: Collins

Change is possible: Four out of the Social Democrats’ six TDs in the new Dáil are women, from left, Jennifer Whitmore, Cian O’Callaghan, Catherine Murphy, Róisín Shortall, Gary Gannon, Holly Cairns. Photo: Collins

Ireland may be heading for its first ever female Taoiseach in Sinn Féin's Mary Lou McDonald but, that apart, the 2020 General Election has proved a pitiful event from a feminist standpoint.

Just 36 of the available 160 seats in Dáil Éireann will be occupied by women. That's one more than last time but still a piffling 22.5pc.

Despite all the talk of quotas and progressiveness and gender balance, we essentially are where we were 10 years ago. Only one woman was elected from five Cork constituencies. None were elected in Limerick or Tipperary.