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For Hiroshima survivor, 70th anniversary rekindles memories of terror, taboos

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Hiroshima City Mayor Kazumi Matsui (R) and a representative of the A-Bomb victims dedicate the name books of the atomic bomb victims to the stone champer at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on the day of the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima

Hiroshima City Mayor Kazumi Matsui (R) and a representative of the A-Bomb victims dedicate the name books of the atomic bomb victims to the stone champer at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on the day of the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima

Hiroshima City Mayor Kazumi Matsui (R) and a representative of the A-Bomb victims dedicate the name books of the atomic bomb victims to the stone champer at the Hiroshima Peace Memorial Park on the day of the 70th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima

It was a warm summer morning, and five-year-old Yukiko Nakabushi was the first to arrive at nursery school. She sat playing quietly as she waited for her friends to come through the door. Except they never arrived.

Instead, at precisely 8.15am, she saw a sudden flash accompanied by a deafeningly loud bang - and in an instant, the world's first atomic bombing transformed the Japanese city of Hiroshima into a living hell.


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