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Fianna Fáil is not having an identity crisis despite what some might say

James Lawless


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Micheal Martin speaks to the media at the RDS venue in Dublin ahead of his address to the 80th Ard Fheis of the Fianna Fail party. Photo: PA

Micheal Martin speaks to the media at the RDS venue in Dublin ahead of his address to the 80th Ard Fheis of the Fianna Fail party. Photo: PA

Fianna Fáil stands on its core values, including the desire to unite our island in a way that welcomes all communities. Pictured, Israel Olatunde after the European Athletics Championships 100m final in August. Photo by Ben McShane/Sportsfile

Fianna Fáil stands on its core values, including the desire to unite our island in a way that welcomes all communities. Pictured, Israel Olatunde after the European Athletics Championships 100m final in August. Photo by Ben McShane/Sportsfile

Taoiseach Micheál Martin. Picture: Reuters

Taoiseach Micheál Martin. Picture: Reuters

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Micheal Martin speaks to the media at the RDS venue in Dublin ahead of his address to the 80th Ard Fheis of the Fianna Fail party. Photo: PA

What a political party stands for and the core values it represents are fundamental. Recent electoral events in Europe have shone a light on political ideology and the aims and objectives of political parties.

The far-right Sweden Democrats, a party founded by neo-Nazis, were the big winners in the Swedish general election, while a party with roots in the Mussolini-inspired neo-fascist movement took power in Italy.


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