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Everyday sexism is rife, so girls need to have their voices heard

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Girls today are smart and articulate and are outperforming boys at both second and third level. But most still struggle to have their voices heard (Stock picture)

Girls today are smart and articulate and are outperforming boys at both second and third level. But most still struggle to have their voices heard (Stock picture)

Girls today are smart and articulate and are outperforming boys at both second and third level. But most still struggle to have their voices heard (Stock picture)

When I arrived to pick her up I knew it hadn't been a great night. "It was meh," she said. Her four friends all agreed as they piled into the car, after a special Transition Year Night (no alcohol) in a club in the city. As we headed out of town into the freezing, foggy night, she filled me in on the night's events.

It started when they were waiting in the queue to enter the club and she needed to use the bathroom. The bouncer was very nice, but said he couldn't admit her. However, he did suggest she try a nearby café which she did, asking one of the two men working there if it was OK to use the bathroom. "Sure," she was told by one of them, who then added "would you like me to come and help you in there?" She was mortified. She is 16.

Later, in the club, she felt a sharp stinging on her legs (she was wearing tights and a skirt) and turned around to find one of the TY boys had taken off his belt and was amusing himself by going around smacking girls on the ass with it. She was furious and shouted at him to "f**k off".


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