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Daring to change how we care for our children could revolutionise all lives

Conor Skehan


A whole childhood approach to childcare could have benefits in all areas of our lives and the economy, writes Conor Skehan

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'A whole childhood approach to childcare could have benefits in all areas of our lives and the economy'. Stock Image

'A whole childhood approach to childcare could have benefits in all areas of our lives and the economy'. Stock Image

'A whole childhood approach to childcare could have benefits in all areas of our lives and the economy'. Stock Image

We must take a long, hard look at what we mean when we say 'back to school'. Covid-19 highlights a reality that school, for many, has become as much about childminding as it is about education. Can our world of work survive unless our children are in school?

This September, that ambiguity about the role of schools in our lives may end in tears, not just for children but for many working adults too. This precariousness cannot continue. We need to dare to rethink and reimagine childcare in the world of work.

Next Saturday is August 1, the start of that most sumptuous holiday month. For many, it marks the turn of the year as a swelling murmur of back-to-school preparations begin with purchases of new children's school uniforms and books. That reassuring annual pattern may be quite different this year if the education system struggles to open in a post-Covid world.