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Carol Hunt: 'Father of our own 'Me Too' movement'

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Talking points: Gay Byrne and Sinead O'Connor in 1999. Photo: David Conachy

Talking points: Gay Byrne and Sinead O'Connor in 1999. Photo: David Conachy

Talking points: Gay Byrne and Sinead O'Connor in 1999. Photo: David Conachy

'Dear God, that's me," said the women in Athlone. "And me," echoed the girl in Derry City. "Me too," said the grandmother in Cahirsiveen. None of these women knew each other. All of them were of different ages and living completely different lives, but they had one thing in common. Gay Byrne gave them a voice, a platform and a means to change their world for the better.

Rosaleen Linehan said Byrne was the Irish woman's "first great affair", but he was more than that. Much, much more. Byrne wanted to know, he really wanted to know, what women thought, how women felt, what women wanted. The relationship he had with Irish women was no mere 'affair'.

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Gay Byrne

Gay Byrne

Gay Byrne

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