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Be wary: whoever succeeds Johnson at No 10 may be even worse

Eilis O'Hanlon


Hoping that the fall of the UK prime minister will kill off populism is wishful thinking as a global recession looms

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A wax figure of Boris Johnson next to a 'vacancy' sign at Madame Tussaud's waxworks in London

A wax figure of Boris Johnson next to a 'vacancy' sign at Madame Tussaud's waxworks in London

Boris wax work

Boris wax work

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A wax figure of Boris Johnson next to a 'vacancy' sign at Madame Tussaud's waxworks in London

Some people seem to hope that the fall of UK prime minister Boris Johnson represents, if not the end, then at least the beginning of the end of a fractious, divisive age.

Guy Verhofstadt, the European Parliament’s former Brexit coordinator, is one of them. Last week he crowed: “Boris Johnson's reign ends in disgrace, just like his friend Donald Trump. The end of an era of transatlantic populism? Let's hope so.”


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