Friday 23 February 2018

Bank crash inquiry threatens press freedom

Whatever role the media had in inflating the bubble, politicians should never hold sway over journalists

Artist Kaya Mar holds his painting depicting Prime Minister David Cameron at the Leveson Inquiry into press standards at the Royal Courts of Justice in London -a similar non-parliamentary inquiry here in relation to the media’s role in the bank crash would have merit.
Artist Kaya Mar holds his painting depicting Prime Minister David Cameron at the Leveson Inquiry into press standards at the Royal Courts of Justice in London -a similar non-parliamentary inquiry here in relation to the media’s role in the bank crash would have merit.
Dan O'Brien

Dan O'Brien

Fresh detail about the nature of the Oireachtas banking inquiry emerged last week. While the inquiry is unlikely to make any substantial change to what is already known about what went wrong, it is very much worth holding.

A disaster on the scale of the Irish banking crash, and the huge costs imposed directly and indirectly on every Irish citizen as a result, means that parliament, in which the sovereign will of the people is vested, must attempt to provide a record of such a significant event in recent Irish history.

One could write a book on the issues to be covered by the investigation, but let me focus on two here: the role of economists and the role of the media.

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