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As the city moves into our living room, our homes have become a national asset

Conor Skehan


Our homes will never be the same again as new ways of living and working are accelerated by the Covid-19 crisis, writes Conor Skehan

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While there are many potential advantages to homeworking, the disadvantages should not be forgotten. The last five weeks have provided the entire population with a chance to experience the down-sides of home working — for those lucky enough to still have work

While there are many potential advantages to homeworking, the disadvantages should not be forgotten. The last five weeks have provided the entire population with a chance to experience the down-sides of home working — for those lucky enough to still have work

While there are many potential advantages to homeworking, the disadvantages should not be forgotten. The last five weeks have provided the entire population with a chance to experience the down-sides of home working — for those lucky enough to still have work

The lockdown has accelerated a change that was already under way in how and where we work. These changes will require new thinking about planning and our personal lives. Are we ready for these changes?

Much of the city centre is now in your living room. Here you can shop, meet friends, watch a movie, order a meal, do office work, or get educated. From your kitchen table you can avail of government services that range from ordering a passport, looking up a planning file to getting health services.

Only 10 years ago, each of these activities required a trip to town. These changes have been accelerating during this time, particularly because of the proliferation of the smartphone. At 90pc, Ireland has one of Europe's highest smartphone penetration rates, compared to the UK's 85pc and a European average of 88pc.