Tuesday 26 March 2019

Anne Applebaum: 'Hypocritical Pence speech shows how far US under Trump has drifted away from EU'

On a mission: Mike Pence at the summit came across as completely tone deaf. Photo: AFP/Getty Images
On a mission: Mike Pence at the summit came across as completely tone deaf. Photo: AFP/Getty Images

Anne Applebaum

Even inside a hotel so secure that it has body scanners at the entrance and snipers on the roof, US Vice President Mike Pence travels with a vast security detail. Its main function, it seems, is to elbow people out of the way so that the vice president and his unsmiling wife can walk through a lobby, crowded with European officials and military brass, and speak to no one. Which is perhaps unsurprising, for Pence was heading to the main forum of the Munich Security Conference - an annual event whose origins lie deep in the Cold War - to make statements so tone-deaf and, frankly, peculiar that their intended audience could not have been the one in the room.

Part of his problem is the new context. Two years ago, when Pence spoke at the same forum, many in Europe were still hoping to work with the Trump administration. His speech was banal and uninspiring - it was "an entirely conventional restatement of American commitment to Europe", I wrote at the time - but Europeans were so relieved to hear it that they decided, on balance, to believe him. Now they don't. At a side event honouring the late senator John McCain, who had been the moving spirit of the Munich conference for decades, Pence announced that "I bring greetings from the 45th president of the United States of America, President Donald Trump". He then waited for applause. None came.

But Pence's keynote speech was more than merely embarrassing. It was awkwardly worded and stiffly delivered. It was sycophantic: over and over again, he repeated the words "under President Trump's leadership", referring to the president as "a champion of freedom" and the "leader of the free world". It was hypocritical: Pence's voice seemed to crack when he spoke of the suffering of Venezuelan refugees - "We hugged their children. We heard of their hardship and their plight" - as if his administration hadn't inflicted plenty of hardship on migrant children wrenched from their parents at the US border with Mexico.

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Pence's speech was also ahistoric, even nonsensical. In one hard-to-follow chain of connections, he bundled together Auschwitz and Iran, somehow implying that Europeans who still back a deal designed to deprive Iran of nuclear weapons were supporting anti-Semitism. In a room full of people working for the European Union and Nato, institutions that were explicitly created, decades ago, to prevent another Auschwitz, this would have been offensive if anybody had actually understood what Pence was trying to say. That, plus the undertone of maudlin religiosity - "I also have that faith, in those ancient words, that where the spirit of the Lord is, there's liberty" - made it clear that this speech was not, as I say, directed at the Europeans in the room. It was made for the benefit of Trump, or maybe Pence's evangelical friends and supporters back home.

That isn't surprising, for this administration's foreign policy has long ceased to have much to do with people who are actually in the room. Just before Pence visited Munich, he and Secretary of State Mike Pompeo attended a surreal Middle East conference in Warsaw whose main purpose, as far as anyone could tell, was to boost Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu's re-election campaign ahead of an April 9 vote. White House senior adviser Jared Kushner is allegedly hard at work on an equally surreal Middle East "peace plan", which the president's son-in-law is devising in secret and apparently without Palestinian input.

These peculiar efforts by Kushner, Pompeo and Pence keep them inside the president's inner circle, and perhaps they cheer up a few donors and boosters. Meanwhile, the US embassy appeared set on preventing the congressional delegation from encountering too many Germans in Munich, cancelling members' attendance at annual meetings and dinners that they have traditionally attended. Conference attendees didn't know whether to feel insulted or to just laugh.

Certainly they have stopped paying lip service to an administration that has showed it prefers its authoritarian friends to its oldest allies.

There is no point in nice state visits or in trying to cultivate Ivanka Trump. It's better to speak bluntly, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel certainly did.

She mocked the idea that German cars made in South Carolina could be a "security threat" to the United States, as the tariff-minded Trump administration has suggested. She said the removal of US troops from Syria will not spread freedom, but will "strengthen Russia and Iran's hand".

And, like other Europeans, she refused to heed Pence's call to reimpose sanctions on Iran. European leaders have learned that there is no point in seeking agreement with Trump, for he doesn't respect those who do. And this, in the end, is why Pence's pseudo-patriotic speech sounded so off: America cannot be the champion of "liberty" or the "leader of the free world" if the free world - insulted by the US president, snubbed by his surrogates - refuses to follow. (© The Washington Post)

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