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After Bloody Sunday came a year of fierce violence and very confused, rudderless political activities

John Downing


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Coffins of the 13 civilians shot dead by British Paratroopers on Bloody Sunday lined up for the funeral at St Mary' s church in Derry city. Photo: Getty Images

Coffins of the 13 civilians shot dead by British Paratroopers on Bloody Sunday lined up for the funeral at St Mary' s church in Derry city. Photo: Getty Images

THE BODY OF JACKIE DUDDY IS CARRIED AWAY LED BY THE CROUCHED FIGURE OF FATHER EDWARD DALY CARRYING A BLOODSTAINED HANDKERCHIEF ON BLOODY SUNDAY

THE BODY OF JACKIE DUDDY IS CARRIED AWAY LED BY THE CROUCHED FIGURE OF FATHER EDWARD DALY CARRYING A BLOODSTAINED HANDKERCHIEF ON BLOODY SUNDAY

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Coffins of the 13 civilians shot dead by British Paratroopers on Bloody Sunday lined up for the funeral at St Mary' s church in Derry city. Photo: Getty Images

There were no good years across those decades of murder and mayhem we euphemistically call the Troubles. But the year 1972, of which the Bloody Sunday murders in Derry were the standout event, was a year of infamy topping all others for the loss of human life.

In the Republic, people’s reaction to news from Derry was vocal, emotional and tinged with violence. The British embassy in Dublin was burned down three days later amid rioting, as protests got out of hand.


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