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A second surge of the coronavirus later in the year remains a possibility with more lockdowns

Prof Luke O'Neill



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CDC Director Robert Redfield. Photo: JIM WATSON / AFP

CDC Director Robert Redfield. Photo: JIM WATSON / AFP

AFP via Getty Images

CDC Director Robert Redfield. Photo: JIM WATSON / AFP

As scientists continue to rip Covid-19 apart, approaching it from every angle imaginable, mysteries persist. Science is full of mysteries, which is what keeps scientists going, trying to provide answers. The biggest question when it comes to Covid-19 is obvious: what's going to happen next? When will things go back to normal? Scientists are trying hard to get an answer to that one. Slowly things are returning to normal in China but not fully, with many restrictions still in place. China is being watched closely. Scientists are also watching Africa, since if it takes off there it will be a huge humanitarian disaster and the virus will be there for a long time - a reservoir to keep reinfecting the rest of the world. A second surge later in the year remains a possibility, with more lockdowns, which nobody wants.

Robert Redfield, the head of the Centre for Disease Control in the US (which has the best scientists when it comes to infectious diseases) has stated some things we definitely know.

First, this is not like the flu: it is three times as infectious and kills at around 10 times the rate of flu. At least 25pc of infected people have no symptoms and can infect others. Those who become symptomatic are infectious four to eight hours before symptoms begin, making infection very hard to contain. Social distancing is the most powerful weapon we currently have. If done properly, this will shut this outbreak down. We also know that most of us (99pc) who get Covid-19 will recover. A vaccine will ultimately be the thing that will protect us and allow life to return to normal although in a different world.