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A long day's journey into the great unknown for both sides

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Supporters at a Yes Rally in George Square ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum on September18th

Supporters at a Yes Rally in George Square ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum on September18th

PA

Saltire flag flies at The Gretna Blacksmiths shop and visitor centre, ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum

Saltire flag flies at The Gretna Blacksmiths shop and visitor centre, ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum

PA

Rangers fans display No Thanks posters during the Rangers versus Inverness Caledonian Thistle soccer match in Glasgow

Rangers fans display No Thanks posters during the Rangers versus Inverness Caledonian Thistle soccer match in Glasgow

REUTERS

Supporters at a Yes Rally in George Square ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum on September18th

Supporters at a Yes Rally in George Square ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum on September18th

PA

The two sides in Scotland's independence debate scrambled Tuesday to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation

The two sides in Scotland's independence debate scrambled Tuesday to convert undecided voters, with just two days to go until a referendum on separation

AP

Two girls walk past Yes graffiti daubed on a wall in Edinburgh

Two girls walk past Yes graffiti daubed on a wall in Edinburgh

AP

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Supporters at a Yes Rally in George Square ahead of voting in the Scottish Referendum on September18th

If I was a gambling woman I would know better than to place a bet on how the Scots will vote in tomorrow's referendum.

I've visited Glasgow and Aberdeen and ended up in Edinburgh. I've canvassed with the 'Yes' side and doorstepped with the 'No', but come tomorrow it's anyone's game as far as I can see.

"I'm voting 'No', but if you put my address in your paper I'll get fire bombed - and I'm certainly not giving you my name," shouted a pensioner from his window in Edinburgh.

I'm out with the Better Together campaign, which wants Scotland to stay in the union.

"I got the bus up from Cardiff last night and got here at 7.25am this morning," 17-year-old John Windmill told me.

And what possessed a Welsh teenager to spend €100 of his pocket money on a bus fare and cough up more money for three nights in a hostel?

"I read that the 'Yes' side was winning by 51pc and I got straight on the bus. I'm British.

"It's not going to cure Aids and make people richer by voting 'Yes', so why separate Great Britain?"asked the teenager. This young Welsh man stands out from the 'No' crowd, while he hasn't even finished secondary school, his counterparts have already finished up their working lives.

Of the seven or so 'No' campaigners, five of them were aged between 65 and 70. And in stark contrast the 'Yes' campaigners are young, educated and full of energy. They're organised, too.

When I joined the 'Yes' group they had split up into streets in the New Town, targeting the wealthy neighbourhoods, where most people are voting 'No'.

"We've covered all of Edinburgh twice so we're just back here today to catch anyone we haven't spoken to yet," said Ben MacPherson (30).

He then showed me a detailed spreadsheet which identified the exact names and addresses of people they have yet to reach. This time around they manage to get Alec Arnold, a pensioner, who used to run the railways in eastern Scotland.

"After long and anguished consideration I'm voting 'No'," said Mr Arnold, as he smoked a cigar and people watched on Dundas Street, the equivalent of Merrion or Fitzwilliam Square, where houses fetch a couple of million.

Ben tries his hand at convincing the pensioner, but he isn't for turning.

"I'm sure Scotland would thrive as an independent country, but that won't be until after five years of upheaval - so that's not in my lifetime," Mr Arnold said.

Back in the HQ of the central Edinburgh 'Yes' campaign things are frantic. Young people run around with stickers and other political paraphernalia and you can't get through the door with volunteers getting ready to head out with them. Back at the 'No' meeting point, they head off from a road junction, with no bells, whistles or notable energy.

A quick sneak around the 'Yes' office shows they're confident of winning tomorrow.

On a noticeboard in the campaign office a sign reads "Referendum Day 18 September."

On it, it states that the Scottish Nationalist Party's club bar has special opening hours on Thursday - "there is a licence until 3am."

Irish Independent