Wednesday 22 November 2017

In disgrace: Downfall could serve as lesson to others

Dominique Strauss-Kahn behaved appallingly because he believed he could

A policewoman stands guard in the courtroom before the start of a trial in the so-called Carlton Affair, in Lille, where 14 people including former IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn stand accused of sex offences including the alleged procuring of prostitutes (REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol)
A policewoman stands guard in the courtroom before the start of a trial in the so-called Carlton Affair, in Lille, where 14 people including former IMF head Dominique Strauss-Kahn stand accused of sex offences including the alleged procuring of prostitutes (REUTERS/Pascal Rossignol)
Ruth Dudley Edwards

Ruth Dudley Edwards

At an all-female birthday lunch-party a few weeks ago, I was sitting between two women who had worked in the city of London in the 1980s. Although they had enjoyed their jobs, they had changed careers when they decided they needed less stress and more sanity. Neither was avaricious, so taking a large drop in income didn't bother them.

"I saw The Wolf of Wall Street," I said. (For those of you who missed this, it's a rollicking tale of grossness and depravity). "Was London like that?"

"I got on fine with the blokes," said the woman on my right, "but many of them were out of control. You just had to stand up to them. Once, when I urgently needed information from another trader, I interrupted him when he was having a blow-job at his desk."

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