Monday 18 December 2017

He hasn't gone away: Salmond lost, but he still matters

Salmond seems not to understand the dangers of unleashing nationalism, says Ruth Dudley Edwards

HE HASN'T GONE AWAY: Though the referendum vote was lost, Alex Salmond, and his demagoguery, will remain in politics. Photo credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
HE HASN'T GONE AWAY: Though the referendum vote was lost, Alex Salmond, and his demagoguery, will remain in politics. Photo credit: Andrew Milligan/PA Wire
Ruth Dudley Edwards

Ruth Dudley Edwards

I went to Pride last week, an entertaining if over-praised movie about how in the 1984 strike, a group of London gays and lesbians befriended and won acceptance from a striking Welsh mining village. Predictably, the villain was the Wicked Witch, who was determined to smash the industry despite the heroic resistance of those described by their eloquent leader, Arthur Scargill, as "part of the greatest struggle on earth".

Time for a reality check. During the 11 years when Margaret Thatcher was prime minister, 160 pits were closed: 290 had gone in the 11 years when Britain was ruled by her Labour predecessors, Harold Wilson and Jim Callaghan. Scargill was no hero. He led his own people to impoverishment in their losing fight against the inevitable.

Thatcher is such a useful bogeywoman that she was being used during the independence debate by both nationalists - to whom she symbolised uncaring, oppressive Westminster - and left-wing unionists, who hurled at First Minister Alex Salmond allegations about how he approved some of her economic policies.

Please sign in or register with Independent.ie for free access to Opinions.

Sign In

Promoted Links

Today's news headlines, directly to your inbox every morning.

Don't Miss