Wednesday 25 April 2018

President splits his opponents in war of words

As chaos continues at the White House, Donald Trump's critics should stop squabbling over each other's moral superiority

'In response to the counter-protests against the white supremacists' protests about the removal of statues, Trump claimed these were the ''violent alt-left''.' Photo: Reuters
'In response to the counter-protests against the white supremacists' protests about the removal of statues, Trump claimed these were the ''violent alt-left''.' Photo: Reuters

Eoin O'Malley

So it's now abundantly clear, as if there had been any doubt, that Donald Trump is mad, bad and dangerous. He's confirmed he's a racist, to add to his earlier admission of being a sexual predator, and a crook. He's brought the prospect of nuclear war closer than any time since the 1960s, though not without the help of others.

Trump is also inept, failing to deliver anything meaningful in his first six months in office. He can't even get his bad laws passed. Leaders of the Republican party have openly criticised his ambivalent comments on white supremacists, and if we're to look at the covers of magazines such as The New Yorker and Time, the media is now actively against him. Almost no one in western Europe is supportive, and any that were must have given up hope.

What appears puzzling, however, is why Trump says and does the things he does, which appear to alienate ever greater numbers of voters. Most would think the idea of siding with gun-toting racists who romanticise a time before the US Civil War is hardly consistent with anyone who would want to win re-election. It's not an issue you'd go out on a limb for unless you really believed in it.

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