Monday 23 October 2017

There's no room for defeatism in Obama's battle with racists

Mourners hug as Ethel Lance is buried at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church cemetery in North Charleston, South Carolina. Lance was one of the nine victims of the shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Photo: Reuters/Brian Snyder
Mourners hug as Ethel Lance is buried at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church cemetery in North Charleston, South Carolina. Lance was one of the nine victims of the shooting at the Emanuel African Methodist Episcopal Church. Photo: Reuters/Brian Snyder
Liz O'Donnell

Liz O'Donnell

The barbaric murder of nine worshippers in Charleston, South Carolina, on June 17 by white supremacist Dylann Roof is the latest in a series of race-related incidents which has shaken American complacency about the state of race relations.

The eldest victim of the Charleston attack was 87-year-old Susie Jackson and the youngest her nephew, aged 26. Four of the slain were reverends.

The 'New York Times' described Roof as a "millennial race terrorist". He was born in 1994, 30 years after the Civil Rights Act was signed into law.

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