Tuesday 20 November 2018

Brexit impasse leaves us stuck with the worst Dáil in history

Deadline: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar meets British Prime Minister Theresa May at 10 Downing Street. Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire
Deadline: Taoiseach Leo Varadkar meets British Prime Minister Theresa May at 10 Downing Street. Photo: Dominic Lipinski/PA Wire
Ivan Yates

Ivan Yates

The beating of collective EU and British heads against the wall of Brexit is destined to continue. The total failure to butt the backstop out of the road at the EU summit this week stops any lingering hope Leo Varadkar might have of going to the country in a December 7 general election.

With heady thoughts of capitalising on a Brexit boost put to bed for now, it's back to work with a bang next week as talks begin between the Blueshirts and Fianna Fáil on the renewal of the confidence and supply agreement. It's no longer just about policy. We will be witnessing whether or not New Politics will end.

Brexit has rightly loomed large on our economic and political landscapes. The fundamental underlying assumption still remains that a cliff edge 'no-deal' UK crash-out is so mutually disastrous for Ireland and Britain that commercial common sense must prevail. And so a withdrawal text will be fudged. Agreement will be reached. There will be a three-year transition period up to 2022, starting on April 1 next, whereby the UK will remain in the full single market - effectively with no overnight trade changes.

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