Saturday 20 January 2018

Varadkar should roll out the red carpet and give President Trump a big Irish welcome

Then-Taoiseach Enda Kenny presents US President Donald Trump with a bowl of shamrock in the White House for St Patrick’s Day
Then-Taoiseach Enda Kenny presents US President Donald Trump with a bowl of shamrock in the White House for St Patrick’s Day
Ian O'Doherty

Ian O'Doherty

For all the talk of the so-called era of 'new politics' we're supposed to have entered, it seems more a case of here comes the new politics, same as the old politics. The squabbling remains, the point scoring continues unabated, and we even have the sight of Paschal Donohoe lamenting the rise of populism - a tactic so belonging to 'old' politics it might as well be carbon dated.

For all the loud protestations to the contrary, it's a fair bet to assume that neither the politicians nor the voters particularly fancy any form of really 'new' politics, because we're an innately conservative people, regardless of the occasional electoral quirk which can invariably be dismissed as angry protest votes rather than signalling a seismic shift away from the traditional paradigms.

But whether we like it or not, and regardless of the various names we use for it, politics, and the global political stage, has changed utterly in the last 18 months and we either adapt to the new circumstances or suffer the consequences.

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