Friday 19 January 2018

Good Friday booze ban rare act of resistance to commerce - so keep it

Deirdre Devitt, president of the Licensed Vintners’ Association, and Pat Crotty, president of the Vintners’ Federation of Ireland, launch their joint 2017 campaign for the lifting of the alcohol ban on Good Friday. Photo: Shane O’Neill Photography
Deirdre Devitt, president of the Licensed Vintners’ Association, and Pat Crotty, president of the Vintners’ Federation of Ireland, launch their joint 2017 campaign for the lifting of the alcohol ban on Good Friday. Photo: Shane O’Neill Photography
David Quinn

David Quinn

The Licensed Vintners' Association and the Vintners' Federation of Ireland are back with their annual campaign to get rid of the rule that bans the sale of alcohol on Good Friday. They are most likely pushing an open door, even if it is taking longer than they might have expected to get their way.

The reason they are pushing an open door is because any law that smells of old Catholic Ireland is bound to get far up the noses of many of our lawmakers. The campaign will also find a good reception in the media.

The law, which is almost a hundred years old, comes from a time when the Catholic Church held a lot more sway in Ireland. For obvious reasons, Good Friday was supposed to be a solemn day and closing the pubs (and once upon a time the shops also), fitted with that. Ireland used to take Good Friday seriously, not just Catholic Ireland. Protestant Ireland took it seriously as well.

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